HOW TO DECORATE VICTORIAN STYLE - DECORATE VICTORIAN STYLE


HOW TO DECORATE VICTORIAN STYLE - DECORATE COLLEGE DORM - APARTMENT DECORATING BLOG



How To Decorate Victorian Style





how to decorate victorian style






    victorian style
  • Victorian fashion comprises the various fashions and trends in British culture that emerged and grew in province throughout the Victorian era and the reign of Victoria, a period which would last from June 1837 to January 1901.

  • An architectural style that dates from the mid-19th century.





    decorate
  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc

  • deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"

  • make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"

  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)

  • award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"

  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it





    how to
  • (How To’s) Multi-Speed Animations

  • A how-to or a how to is an informal, often short, description of how to accomplish some specific task. A how-to is usually meant to help non-experts, may leave out details that are only important to experts, and may also be greatly simplified from an overall discussion of the topic.

  • Practical advice on a particular subject; that gives advice or instruction on a particular topic

  • Providing detailed and practical advice











how to decorate victorian style - Decorating with




Decorating with White


Decorating with White



White is a colour capable of endless subtleties--and challenging to use. Uncover the secrets of decorating the "white house" in more than 150 beautiful photographs. Richly traditional, clean-lined contemporary, rustic country, breezy tropical, lushly romantic: every style is here, with a tour of the exquisite fabrics (cotton, linen, lace) that bring them to life. From summery designs, so perfect for white, to light and bright gardens, porches, and terraces, you'll fall under the spell of this elegant colour










79% (15)





Block Arcade dome 5039




Block Arcade dome 5039





VHR citation
BLOCK ARCADE
Location
280 - 286 COLLINS STREET 96 - 102 ELIZABETH STREET MELBOURNE, Melbourne City

Google Maps and Google Streetview
Victorian Heritage Register (VHR) Number
H0032

Heritage Overlay Number
HO596

a Level of Significance
Registered


Extent of Registration 1. All the building known as the Block Arcade marked B1 on Diagram 32 held by the Executive Director.

2. All the land marked L1 on Diagram 32 held by the Executive Director, being the land described in Certificate of Titles Vol. 4645 Fol. 875, part of Vol. 9409 Fol. 669, Vol. 9924 Fol. 206, Vol. 9409 Fol. 669 and Vol. 4645 Fol. 874.

Statement of Significance
What is significant?
The Block Arcade was developed by financier Benjamin Fink. The Collins Street section of the building was completed in February 1892 and is similar in style to the Milano Galleria Vittorio Arcade in Italy. The new shopping arcade was designed by David.C.Askew of the architectural firm Twentyman and Askew. The cost of erection was ?46 233. The bluestone footings for the building came from the original structure on the site, the Briscoe & Company Bulk Store. The site of 96-102 Elizabeth Street was purchased by the City Property Company Ltd in January 1892. Architect David Askew was called upon to continue his style for the arcade and this area was completed in October the following year. The Block Arcade comprises of arcade shops with mezzanine levels above for social rooms and offices, shops to Collins Street, Block Place and Elizabeth Street and four levels of office space above. The arcade forms an L-shape with a polygonal planned space with a glazed roof at the corner of the L. The kink in the plan was due to the shape of the original block subdivision and the location of Block Place, the lane behind. Linking the two spaces is an elaborately patterned mosaic floor of tiles, which were imported from Europe. When the arcade was constructed the Building and Engineering Journal noted that the flooring contained the largest area of mosaics yet laid down in Australia. In 1907, scenic artist Philip Goatcher for the Singer Sewing Machine Company decorated the ceiling of their premises on the east corner of the Collins Street entry to the arcade. The other shop to Collins Street, which housed the first Kodak shop in Melbourne contains an elaborate pressed metal ceiling. The facades to Collins and Elizabeth Street are designed in the Victorian Mannerist style with elaborate stucco decoration. Particular facade elements include; triangular and segmental pediments; rustication and an exaggerated cornice with brackets. Features of the upstairs office spaces include timber joinery around lift entries, tessellated tiles to the lobby spaces, elaborate leadlight windows and decorative plasterwork to arches in the corridors. There is also one surviving communal timber telephone box situated in a corridor.

How is it significant?
The Block Arcade is of architectural, aesthetic, social and historical importance to the State of Victoria.

Why is it significant?
The Block Arcade is of architectural and aesthetic importance as an excellent intact example of a shopping arcade. The design draws on early and influential European models and as such is important in its ability to demonstrate the essential and typical qualities of those designs and the continuity of the tradition of covered shopping streets. The Elizabeth and Collins Street facades are fine examples of the Mannerist style demonstrating many of the characteristic elements, such as a combination of triangular and segmental pediments and rustication. The Block Arcade is of architectural and aesthetic significance as it features lavish interior decoration, including an extraordinary mosaic tile floor. Based on the Milan Galleria Vittoria, it has a glass roof over the arcade with a glass dome at is corner. Its internal spaces, with their high quality finishes, have been maintained and the arcade remains a grand and prestigious retailing precinct. Attention to detail has also been carried through to the office spaces on the levels above the arcade.

The Block Arcade is of social and historical importance as the grandest and most fashionable amongst what became an extensive network of retail arcades that provided an alternative pedestrian route to Melbourne's major streets. Many of the arcades constructed in Melbourne before the turn of the century have not survived or have been altered considerably. The Block Arcade is important as an essential element in the social institution of doing The Block. This was a friendly expression referring to the stylish shopping trend of the late 19th century which involved starting in Collins Street at Swanston, then moving west to Elizabeth, north to Little Collins Street and back to Swanston. The Block was the place to be seen and those who frequented the popular thoroughfare, its shops and tea houses were often recorded by caricaturists in the city's social pages.
Ye











Block Arcade 5043




Block Arcade 5043







VHR citation
BLOCK ARCADE
Location
280 - 286 COLLINS STREET 96 - 102 ELIZABETH STREET MELBOURNE, Melbourne City

Google Maps and Google Streetview
Victorian Heritage Register (VHR) Number
H0032

Heritage Overlay Number
HO596

a Level of Significance
Registered


Extent of Registration 1. All the building known as the Block Arcade marked B1 on Diagram 32 held by the Executive Director.

2. All the land marked L1 on Diagram 32 held by the Executive Director, being the land described in Certificate of Titles Vol. 4645 Fol. 875, part of Vol. 9409 Fol. 669, Vol. 9924 Fol. 206, Vol. 9409 Fol. 669 and Vol. 4645 Fol. 874.

Statement of Significance
What is significant?
The Block Arcade was developed by financier Benjamin Fink. The Collins Street section of the building was completed in February 1892 and is similar in style to the Milano Galleria Vittorio Arcade in Italy. The new shopping arcade was designed by David.C.Askew of the architectural firm Twentyman and Askew. The cost of erection was ?46 233. The bluestone footings for the building came from the original structure on the site, the Briscoe & Company Bulk Store. The site of 96-102 Elizabeth Street was purchased by the City Property Company Ltd in January 1892. Architect David Askew was called upon to continue his style for the arcade and this area was completed in October the following year. The Block Arcade comprises of arcade shops with mezzanine levels above for social rooms and offices, shops to Collins Street, Block Place and Elizabeth Street and four levels of office space above. The arcade forms an L-shape with a polygonal planned space with a glazed roof at the corner of the L. The kink in the plan was due to the shape of the original block subdivision and the location of Block Place, the lane behind. Linking the two spaces is an elaborately patterned mosaic floor of tiles, which were imported from Europe. When the arcade was constructed the Building and Engineering Journal noted that the flooring contained the largest area of mosaics yet laid down in Australia. In 1907, scenic artist Philip Goatcher for the Singer Sewing Machine Company decorated the ceiling of their premises on the east corner of the Collins Street entry to the arcade. The other shop to Collins Street, which housed the first Kodak shop in Melbourne contains an elaborate pressed metal ceiling. The facades to Collins and Elizabeth Street are designed in the Victorian Mannerist style with elaborate stucco decoration. Particular facade elements include; triangular and segmental pediments; rustication and an exaggerated cornice with brackets. Features of the upstairs office spaces include timber joinery around lift entries, tessellated tiles to the lobby spaces, elaborate leadlight windows and decorative plasterwork to arches in the corridors. There is also one surviving communal timber telephone box situated in a corridor.

How is it significant?
The Block Arcade is of architectural, aesthetic, social and historical importance to the State of Victoria.

Why is it significant?
The Block Arcade is of architectural and aesthetic importance as an excellent intact example of a shopping arcade. The design draws on early and influential European models and as such is important in its ability to demonstrate the essential and typical qualities of those designs and the continuity of the tradition of covered shopping streets. The Elizabeth and Collins Street facades are fine examples of the Mannerist style demonstrating many of the characteristic elements, such as a combination of triangular and segmental pediments and rustication. The Block Arcade is of architectural and aesthetic significance as it features lavish interior decoration, including an extraordinary mosaic tile floor. Based on the Milan Galleria Vittoria, it has a glass roof over the arcade with a glass dome at is corner. Its internal spaces, with their high quality finishes, have been maintained and the arcade remains a grand and prestigious retailing precinct. Attention to detail has also been carried through to the office spaces on the levels above the arcade.

The Block Arcade is of social and historical importance as the grandest and most fashionable amongst what became an extensive network of retail arcades that provided an alternative pedestrian route to Melbourne's major streets. Many of the arcades constructed in Melbourne before the turn of the century have not survived or have been altered considerably. The Block Arcade is important as an essential element in the social institution of doing The Block. This was a friendly expression referring to the stylish shopping trend of the late 19th century which involved starting in Collins Street at Swanston, then moving west to Elizabeth, north to Little Collins Street and back to Swanston. The Block was the place to be seen and those who frequented the popular thoroughfare, its shops and tea houses were often recorded by caricaturists in the city's social pages.










how to decorate victorian style








how to decorate victorian style




Jessica McClintock's Simply Romantic Decorating: Creating Elegance and Intimacy Throughout Your Home






Award-winning designer Jessica McClintock, whose name is synonymous with romance, shows readers how to cultivate lush, delicate beauty and warmth in their own living spaces

From special-occasion wear and perfume to home accessories and furnishings, Jessica McClintock has created a lifestyle brand dedicated to romance and femininity--one that resonates with generations of women all over the world. Her San Francisco Victorian house is the epitome of intimacy and grace and has been featured on television programs and in such magazines as Victoria, Architectural Digest, Redbook, and Home Design. Now she invites readers into her home and shows them how to incorporate romantic elements into their own homes, without sacrificing their individual style or spending a great deal of time or money.

The book's special features include:

• chapters devoted to each room in the house with innovative ideas for bringing romance and comfort into every corner, including outdoor spaces

• illustrated do-it-yourself projects inspired by Jessica's decor using simple design principles, basic sewing and crafting skills, and a little imagination

• a private tour of the author's showplace home--inside and out--through 100 gorgeous, full-color photographs, shot exclusively for this book

Jessica McClintock's Simply Romantic Decorating is a blueprint for readers on how to indulge their romantic decorating fantasies with timeless style and personal flair.










See also:

holiday outdoor decorating ideas

retro apartment decor

home accents decor

tropical room decorating ideas

college apartment decorating ideas

decorating ranch style

decorative solar garden lights

black and white room decorating



tag : how to decorate victorian style decorative iron wall a cabin

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